Aimee O'Donnell Saunders

In the Kingston Market Place, in the autumn of 1999, Aimee O’Donnell Saunders became hooked on the idea of LUSH, on cosmetics made FRESH, out of beautiful, active ingredients. The products have been a part of her life (and bathroom) ever since. As luck would have it, Aimee got a temporary job at the Powell Street shop in San Francisco in November 2004. Another toss of the LUSH dice found her keeping that job well beyond the holidays as she’s still around! Aimee’s enjoyed the opportunity to be a Product Trainer for North America for over 7 years, travel extensively, and work with LUSH folk in a plethora of projects. She is known for ever-changing hairstyles, favoring bold patterns and bright colors, and rowdy cheering at baseball games. You can find her in San Francisco most days - just follow the scent of Furze perfume.

Jun 06.21

Summer Solstice: Building a Fairy Garden Step-By-Step

LUSH Life >> DIY

Summer Solstice and its surrounding days bring out more than just extra sunshine.

There’s also an open invitation to connect with Nature in her many forms. Doing something outside during these mystical stretches of extra daylight forges that connection…practicing yoga in the park, or unpacking a picnic dinner along the shoreline. As the days dance between spring and summer this Solstice, it’s also an optimum time to invite Nature to play at your house by building a Fairy Garden. Fairy Gardens are miniature green spaces created with a lot of whimsy and imagination, like outdoor dollhouses for the wee folk with wings in your community. Having made a few recently in our home garden, I can personally attest that this has made me not only happier, but more inspired to do larger landscaping and decorating projects as well.

In celebration of the Summer Solstice here are some suggestions to get building:

Step One: Gather up supplies

DIY Fairy Garden step 1

  • You can build right on top of the ground, around a tree, or in containers of all kinds. I turned over an old drawer to make a platform that was super easy to build a Fairy Park on top of. Remember- use your imagination!

  • Scoring big at a rummage sale with teacups, a pot lid, a topless teapot and a like-new bag of decorative moss all priced under a quarter, I didn’t break the bank for this project.

  • Also used are odds and ends around the playhouse and yard: a bird house, ribbon, a few toys, a LUSH black pot, chop sticks, glass beads, white stones, and birdseed to welcome feathered friends as well as gossamer-winged.

  • Flowers and fairies go hand in hand, too! Herbs and small groundcover all work really well, too. Twigs, leaves, rocks, and water all can play an important role in your tiny garden. Nature is full of spirits, not just fairies!

 

Step Two: Get crafty!

DIY Fairy Garden step 2

  • Bird feeders are easily made by filling saucers with seeds, and a side-turned cup. I also nestled another cup filled with fresh water into a seeded saucer--offering a little snack and sip, too. (Warning: busy little hands + open birdseed feeders = birdseed everywhere, but that’s part of the fun)

  • Tic Tac Toe is the result of rocks, glass, a sharpie and the lid of an old box. Painted rocks would be cute, too - another great project!

  • Two chopsticks with ribbon made a Fairy Swing atop the topless teapot--now the best view in the whole park.

 

Step Three: Leave an offering

DIY Fairy Garden step 3

  • Fairies love gifts and messages, and appreciate an invitation to come play (so I’ve been told).

  • I set out a lip-gloss ring and wrote a greeting. We’ll put out more treats later - shiny and glittery things, more toys and games to play with, maybe a solar powered garden light? Do fairies like LUSH products? We’ll have to see with the world’s tiniest soap samples.

  • You can also release ladybugs into your Fairy Garden, or add a happy wish.

 

DIY Fairy Garden for Summer Solstice

Adapt this recipe in whatever strikes your fancy, and of course add in lots of flowers, herbs, or other items! My family and I have another fairy picnic ground set up in a hanging basket. It resides under one of the birdhouses, with another teacup feeder. And sometimes in gloomier weather, we bring it all indoors for some countertop play. 

I'm not an expert on fairies, but I certainly enjoy creating these little habitats for them. It brings out a feeling of being both young and old at the same time, which is kind of how I think of fairies. And I know a certain 5-year-old is going to love this Fairy Park surprise when she gets home today, and that delight is always contagious. In making Fairy Gardens over the years, I’ve found that the location and items themselves aren’t nearly as important as the spirit and joy poured into their creation.

Whether you are a seasoned Fairy Gardener, or just want a charming project, these are delightful fun for children of all ages, and an enchanting way to celebrate your own Midsummer Night’s Dream come true.

Tags